Retro Tattoo Styles

Retro Tattoo Styles

Retro Tattoo Styles

7 Retro Tattoo Styles That Still Rock

Are you planning to get a tattoo for the first time? Or do you already have a couple and wish to add another one that will never go out of style? Then one of the best options to consider is the retro or old-school tattoo styles.

The love affair between Americans and tattoos go a long way. And today, more Americans are getting tattoos compared to almost a decade ago.

Not to mention, there are more tattoo choices today than ever before. But why should you consider going retro on tattoos? What are the classic styles that will still make you stand out in this modern age?

Continue reading below for seven retro tattoo styles deserving of a spot on your skin.

1. The Classic Americana

First on our list of timeless old-school tattoo styles is the Classic Americana. You can easily spot this traditional style tattoos through some key elements. It features solid colors, iconic imagery, and bold black lines.

Classic Americana tattoos trace its roots from way back to the 18th century. But it first became popular in the mainstream tattoo scene in the 1930s. It was tattoo artist Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins who popularized the style.

Back then, Classic Americana tattoos often depicted animals, roses, pin-ups, skulls, and nautical themes. You can even see people sporting this tattoo style with a standard heart tattoo.

2. The Japanese Style

Another old-school option is the Japanese tattoo style or Irezumi. It features remarkable artistry and deep and dark history. Irezumi traces its origins from the Jomon Period (10,000 BCE-300 CE).

However, modern Japanese style tattoos rose to prominence between the years 1603 and 1868. This was during the Edo Period where Japan deemed tattooing as illegal. Hence, the Japanese often associated tattooing to crime, as well as filial piety.

Furthermore, the older Japanese people shunned on tattooing for another reason. They claimed that tattoos somewhat disrespected the body. In turn, they viewed tattooing as a way of breaking the codes of obedience and respect.

As for the designs, Japanese tattoos feature very large images. These images are big enough to cover the entire back. Other areas where artists place the tattoos include the arms and legs.

3. Stick and Poke

Stick and poke tattoos became one of the hottest tattoo styles back in the 1970s. The name originated from the manner of inking the tattoo on the skin. The tattoo artists do not use any machines to ink the skin.

Instead, they use a rod-like contraption where they attach a needle on the end. Thereafter, they dip the needle into the ink and apply it to the skin by hand. The ink settles deep into the skin as the artist pokes the needle dot by dot.

When it comes to the designs, they are far less intricate compared to other tattoo styles. Most of the recent designs feature bold lines with minor decorative patterns.

Check out our Maui Tattoo shop or our Las Vegas Tattoo shop

4. Black and Grey

Some people call black and gray tattoos as “jailhouse” tattoos. Legend has it that this particular style started inside the prison. In prison, inmates use inks and handmade machines for tattooing.

Artists had to improvise when it came to the materials. They used pen ink and cigarette ashes to make the tattoo ink. They converted old guitar strings into needles.

But on the outside, black and gray started to gain a following in the 1970s. Artists use different techniques in creating their designs.

However, the key lies in the shading variation. Good artists can combine deep and soft shadows and hues. To get more solid grey tones, they mix black ink with white ink.

This leveling in the shades is the secret to keeping your black and grey tattoos from fading.

5. Blackwork

If the black and grey style showcases a fusion of two colors, blackwork tattoo proudly boast solid planes of black. Most of the time, blackwork artists depict geometric shapes.

Sometimes, they present abstract patterns. But the common denominator is that they tend to use minimalist images and symbols. This is because of the tattoos Polynesian origins.

But in western culture, blackwork tattoos became fashionable in Europe during the 18th century. It was the laborers who often sported this particular tattoo style.

Today, you will be one of the coolest if you have one on the arms or at the back.

6. Abstract

Though some people may consider abstract tattoos as relatively new, you can trace its roots toward the end of the 19th century. It was a time when artists were feeling the need to come up with a new form of art.

They want this new art to represent the changing landscape in science, technology, and philosophy. Hence, they started to move to the more creative use of shapes, colors, and expressions.

Today, abstract tattoos are a sight to behold. They showcase visual excellence, as well as conceptual beauty.

7. Realism

Last but not least are the tattoos that use realism. Realism tattooing became popular in the 1970s inside California’s Chicano prisons.

As the name implies, these tattoos look realistic. Thus, they come in virtually any color the artists want.

Some use a mixture of bright and dark colors. Others stick to the neutral black and white tones. The color choice depends on the subject and theme of the tattoos.

These subjects can be objects, animals, scenery, or people.

Important Reminders for Before Getting a Tattoo

Retro Tattoo Styles

Retro Tattoo Styles

Regardless of the retro style tattoos that you pick, there are certain rules that you need to observe. And if it is your first time going through the artistic needle, you need to know some hard facts about tattoos.

First, you will feel a constant scratching on your skin. But after the first 15 minutes, your adrenaline should help reduce the pain. However, the pain does not stop there, as you will experience redness and swelling in the area after the procedure.

If you wish to experience the least amount of pain, pick a fleshier spot on your body. Your forearms and wrists are excellent spots for first-timers.

Last but not least, make sure to check the reputation of your tattoo artist. Go for someone with a trusted name in the local tattoo scene to ensure your safety.

Let’s Get You the Tattoo Styles You Want, Today!

Sporting retro tattoo styles is a good way of expressing yourself. But when choosing the designs, make sure to pick something that you feel good and comfortable about. And if you’re looking for an artist you can trust, then you came to the right place.  To see what other style that are popular this year, check out our friends at Feedspot and their Top 50 Tattoo Blogs & Websites For Tattoo Artists & Enthusiasts in 2020

Connect with us today and share with us your design ideas. Let us discuss your options and let’s get you the tattoos that you want.

Dog Tattoo Ideas

Dog Tattoo Ideas

Canine Love: 8 Amazing Tattoo Ideas for Dog Lovers

Amazing Dog Tattoo Ideas

Immortalize your love and the ups and downs you had together with your canine best friend with these amazing dog tattoo ideas.

Americans love their dogs: over 63 million U.S. households are home to at least one canine.

Most dog lovers show off their love for man’s best friend by wearing dog t-shirts or hats or putting a sticker on their car. We here at Skin Factory Tattoo, however, think there’s no better way to proclaim your puppy love to the world than by getting a dog tattoo.

The possibilities are endless for dog lovers. Here’s a look at eight inspired dog tattoo ideas. One of these may just be your next tat.

1. Your Dog

The most obvious tattoo design for any dog owner is to get a rendition of their beloved fur baby. The only drawback is that as tattoos are permanent you have to be OK with seeing a reminder of a deceased pet on your body every day. Although, this can also be a wonderful way to memorialize a beloved part of your family.

For this type of tattoo, it’s best to take photos of your dog and narrow them down to two to three possible shots to show to your tattoo artist. You may want them to capture an exceptionally cute or funny expression that shows off your dog’s personality.

2. Go Abstract

Your tattoo artwork doesn’t have to be highly detailed and show every hair on your dog to be beautiful. Many tattoo artists can take an image and interpret it in an abstract, modern way. We’re not talking about drawing an unrecognizable Picasso-esque version of your dog, but maybe incorporating bright colors, hard-edged shapes, and patterns into the image for a design that really pops.

3. Go Minimal

Maybe you don’t want a big, colorful, splashy tattoo of your dog covering a lot of skin. The good news is dog tattoos can be minimal, too! The perfect dog tattoo for you may consist of a few black lines that form your dog’s face and expression, or your favorite breed.

Or you may want something as simple as the outline of a heart tattooed along with a short sentimental quote about what pet ownership means to you. How about the dog constellation Canis Major with an outline of a dog superimposed over it? Going minimal is a great option for the person who wants a more subdued tattoo design.

4. Paw Print

If you don’t want an image of a dog on your skin but still want to convey your love for all things canine, a paw print tattoo may be the perfect compromise.

And we’re not just talking about cute little cartoon-like paw prints (unless you’d like a trail of those along a body area) but a large, realistic-looking paw impression. Many owners with big dogs even opt for a life-sized rendition of their pooch’s paw print on an arm or leg.

Tattoo artists can get very detailed with this idea by inking in the texture of your dog’s toe pads or making it look like they stepped in mud before they stepped on you. Or they can incorporate your dog’s face into the paw print.

Artists can get surprisingly creative with this tattoo design, so this is definitely one idea you may want to explore.

5. Multiple Dogs

What’s better than one dog tattoo? Several, of course! A really cute idea is to have three or four dog heads tattooed on your lower back, inner arm, or calf area.

If you own more than one pet, this is a great way to include them all in your tattoo design.

6. Your Dog’s Name

Another classic tattoo design is to simply have your dog’s name tattooed. You can choose to have their profile illustrated along with the name, or opt to just have the named inked. You can choose a simple, black and white font, or go for a more decorative and colorful one. The possibilities are endless, and the choice is up to you.

Your artist can also incorporate dog imagery with the lettering—such as a paw print or dog bone—so people will know the name is referring to a loved pet. Some people get a tattoo design depicting a heart-shaped dog tag that has their dog’s name.

7. Flowers and Other Decorative Touches

The beauty of tattoos is what they allow you to get as creative as you like, and that means you can include decorative elements in your dog tattoo such as flowers, stars, or other embellishments.

You could also get a tattoo that pays homage to your dog’s roots, such as showing pine trees behind an Alaskan husky, or a Bavarian mountain behind a German shepherd.

8. Your Dog’s Alter Ego

Do you think your dog sees himself as a superhero, keeping your yard safe from squirrels and alerting you to strangers? Or maybe he has an inner rock star, as evident by his howling each time you play music.

You can get playful with your tattoo design by incorporating a bit of your best friend’s personality into the artwork. Your tattoo artist can render your dog wearing sunglasses or include superhero tattoo elements such as a cape and mask.

Explore These Dog Tattoo Ideas

Dog Tattoo Ideas

Dog Tattoo Ideas

As you can see, dog tattoo ideas are really only limited by your imagination. Your tattoo artist should also have plenty of other ideas to help you find the perfect way to show off your love of your dog, or dogs in general, to everyone.

Thinking of getting a dog tattoo, or a tat to symbolize another pet or animal? Contact us to schedule an appointment to discuss your tattoo ideas with us. Our artists will make your vision a reality.

Foot Tattoos

Foot Tattoos

Watch Your Step: Everything You Need to Know About Foot Tattoos

Watch Your Step: Everything You Need to Know About Foot Tattoos

Foot tattoos are unique, sexy, and are easy to hide, but are they really the perfect tattoo? This guide will list the pros and cons of a foot tattoo.

Are you set on the perfect foot tattoo to decorate your dogs?

There are some important things you should know before you take the plunge —and pain is just the beginning.

Foot tattoos are unique, sexy, and are easy to hide, but are they really the perfect tattoo? This guide will list the pros and cons of a foot tattoo.

Do Foot Tattoos Hurt?

It’s well known within the tattoo industry that foot tattoos are among the most painful.

This is because, in order to insert the pigment permanently into your skin, your tattoo artist drives a needle beneath the skin’s surface. Obviously this is going to hurt on any part of your body. But places that have more nerve endings, like your foot, are going to hurt a lot more.

There are two elements to tattoos which include the linework and shading. Both can create an intense burning sensation from the needle scratching your skin. Unlike other parts of your body where flesh or muscle will help to dull the pain.

Your feet have more exposed nerve endings in your feet, over 7,000 nerve endings to be exact. At times you may feel your bones vibrating. Brace yourself for some intense pain if you’re set on a foot tattoo. If it’s your first one you might want to keep it simpler.

The other aspect that makes a foot tattoo a challenge is that your feet tend to react quickly to stimulation. Which is why if you get tickled on your feet your reflex is to kick out.

To stop yourself from jerking you’re going to have the urge to tense your body. This can lead to more pain.

This can be a problem when you’re trying to stay completely still during a tattoo. A skilled tattoo artist will expect this and be able to react accordingly.

Why Tiny Foot Tattoos Are a Bad Idea

If you’re frustrated with a tattoo artist for not giving you a tiny tattoo on your foot, then we can explain. Foot tattoos tend to bleed over time. So something very small can begin to smudge on the parts of your foot you use the most.

Ultimately they’re saving future you from a blobby mess on your foot years down the road. Make sure you find the right tattoo artist. Some will refuse to do foot tattoos at all since they can be dangerous if infected and also fade faster in the wrong places.

Where Should You Get One?

As we mentioned, getting a foot tattoo in the wrong place can lead to it fading or smudging. So where should you get a foot tattoo?

The problem is most areas on your foot are used. For example, the sides of your feet tend to rub on your shoes all day. The top of your foot is an option but it will hurt more.

Ankle tattoos need extra care to prevent them from fading in the sun. Ultimately you’ll have to find the best spot for your design as well as your body. Work with a professional to find your ideal placement.

You will also need to decide the orientation of your tattoo. Such as if the tattoo should face you right side up or be facing other people. This is all personal preference.

Care for Your Foot Tattoo

During the time when your foot tattoo is healing it’s going to be difficult to wear shoes. For this reason, you may want to plan to get your foot tattoo during the summer months or when it’s warmer. This will allow you to wear flip flops, sandals, or ballet flats.

At the same time, you don’t want to expose your tattoo to the sun for too long. In fact, your tattoo is going to need a lifetime of sunscreen applications to protect it and keep it from fading.

Yes, this is true for most tattoos that are exposed. But your foot can be especially prone to direct sunlight when wearing sandals and showing it off. So you need to be extra careful.

It’s important to strictly follow the directions of your tattoo artist. Since a tattoo is an open wound, not caring for it appropriately could lead to serious infection.

Foot tattoos are even more prone to infections than others. You won’t be able to submerge your tattoo in water or expose it to the sun for at least two weeks.

Surprise You Have A Foot Tattoo!

Foot Tattoos

Foot Tattoos

The fun thing about a foot tattoo is once you’ve gotten through the pain and aftercare you’re going to be really excited each time you see it. That’s because you may forget sometimes that you even have a foot tattoo.

Foot tattoos are subtle and you probably won’t notice it every day. So when it catches your eye from time to time, it’ll be like a special surprise you get to experience again and again.

The only thing about the excitement of having a tattoo is it will make you want another one!

Despite the pain, foot tattoos are aesthetically pleasing and increasingly popular. Once you have one you’ll want to show it off to all your friends and family.

Ready to Get Inked?

Foot tattoos may be a bit more painful but they sure look amazing when completed. Once you get through a couple of weeks, you’ll be dying to get a matching one on your other foot!

If you’d like to speak with a professional tattoo artist who can provide you with the delicate foot tattoo you’re dreaming of, then check out our two locations. Our artists are highly skilled and professional.

Want to learn more about types of tattoos and piercings? Along with what to expect? Check out our blog for expert advice.

History of Tattoos in America

History of Tattoos in America

Walk Through the History of Tattoos in America

Walk Through the History of Tattoos in America

The Americas have a rich tradition of tattooing. Continue reading here to find out more about the history of tattoos in America.

Thinking about getting a tattoo? Do it! You’ll be joining the many that have come to understand the rich art that is tattooing.

Though, tattooing wasn’t always viewed that way.

Before you go jumping the gun, let’s take a look at the history of tattoos in America. You’ll be surprised to find how this art form has developed, and may even find inspiration for your next piece!

Let’s dive in.

Early History of Tattoos in America

Towards the end of the 19th century, tattoos were widely considered taboo in America. Socialite Ward McAllister had this to say about them: “It is certainly the most vulgar and barbarous habit the eccentric mind of fashion ever invented. It may do for an illiterate seaman, but hardly for an aristocrat.”

Though socialites like McAllister may have looked upon tattoos with disgust, there were many who valued tattoos for what they represented. Those in the military, especially, shared the understanding that tattoos were symbols of courage and patriotism.

Records of these 19th century-style tattoos were found in naval logs, letters, and diaries written by seaman. The designs of these traditional American tattoos developed from the artists who traded and improved upon each other’s styles. The tattoos evolved a series of stories and symbols that united soldiers and sailors across the World Wars.

 

The most well-known tattoo artist of the time was Martin Hildebrandt. In 1870, Hildebrandt opened a studio on Oak Street in New York City, considered the first tattooing establishment in America. He worked there for over 20 years, where he would soon see a shift in the country’s perception of tattoos with the rise of the traveling circus.

The Circus Sideshow

The traveling circus was the spectacle of the year for many small, rural towns across America. There, those who never left their homes and farms could experience such wonders and horrors that seemed out of this world.

One of these sideshow attractions was that of the fully tattooed person.

Frank and Emma DeBurdg were one of these exhibits. Along with the usual designs of patriotic insignias and religious symbols, the couple also displayed tattoos they shared to represent their relationship and bond.

Frank had tattooed on him a beautiful script with the words “For Get Me Not” inscribed above a pretty portrait of his wife, Emma. She, in return, had their names beautifully adorned and displayed prominently for all to see.

This display of affection for one another caught the attention of the public, appealing to their romantic senses. The DeBurdgs saw great success touring America and Europe, and with their exposure so did the art of tattooing gain appreciation with the public.

O’Reilly’s Invention

Traditional tattooing was a bit cumbersome for the artist.

Early tattoo artists used a needle attached to a wooden handle. They would dip this needle in ink and then manually stab the skin two to three times to imprint the ink onto a specific spot. The technique required great dexterity and mental fortitude.

Samuel O’Reilly revolutionized the practice almost overnight.

In addition to being a talented artist, O’Reilly was a skilled technician and mechanic. He theorized that if up and down motion of the needle could be automated, the artist could tattoo nearly as quickly as they could draw on paper.

In 1891, O’Reilly released his invention and offered it to the public along with enriched colored inks, tattoo designs, and other tools. Tattooing in the United States was turned on its head overnight. O’Reilly was swarmed with orders for his invention as more and more artists entered the field of tattooing.

World Influence

Working class men in America commonly adorned tattoos primarily as symbols of masculinity and pride. Soldiers and sailors that served on foreign lands, however, brought home with them a different form of body ornamentation.

While on their travels, these soldiers and sailors experienced the practices and customs of the indigenous cultures of Asia, Africa, and the South Pacific. Their individual uses of tattoos were a bit different from that of typical American art.

This caused a revival of interest in tattoos in American societies across the country. That is to say, specifically, the rebel youth culture of the late twentieth century.

The Beatniks of the 1950s and the Hippies of the ’60s gained a great appreciation for Asian tattooing practices. They admired the personal expression of spiritual and mysticism found in these cultures.

Conversely, the youth of the Punk movement in the ’70s and ’80s used tattoos as symbols of rebellion. They found solace in tattoos as a representation for their feelings of imprisonment by society’s standards for class and decorum.

Modern Tattooing Practices

History of Tattoos in AmericaWhile tattooing was once a taboo topic in America, now it’s a rising career field for many fledgling artists.

More and more artists are being professionally trained in academies across the country. A study done in the late 1980s estimated that the number of trained artists per year has doubled in comparison to the number of artists that graduated in the ’70s. However, not as many galleries are being built to host the works of these young artists.

But there are plenty of people looking for tattoos.

As a result, these trained artists are bringing with them the plethora of skills and techniques they’ve learned from these art programs. They carry a sense of innovation and experimentation, already giving rise to new tattoo styles such as New Skool and Bio-Mechanical.

What was previously a disdained and marginalized artform, tattooing has been undergoing a process of cultural reform the past few decades. New meanings of tattoo are being developed by gallery exhibits and critics that reframe the practice for what it is: art.

Get Tattooed Today!

There you have it—the rich history of tattoos in America!

If you’re in the area, give us a shout and we can give you an in-depth look at our history with tattooing. Our artists are always happy to give a consultation on any tattoo or design!

Stop by our Maui Tattoo Shop or Henderson Tattoo Shop

Glow in the Dark Tattoos

Glow in the Dark Tattoos

Everything You Need to Know About Glow in the Dark Tattoos

Glow in the Dark Tattoos – Everything You Need to Know

Have you been considering whether or not to buy into the trend of glow in the dark tattoos? We break down everything you need to know, including the good, the bad, and the questionable.

Glow in the Dark TattoosEvery year, there are new fads and trends which become popular for a few months throughout the year. These inevitably die off before the strike of midnight. The trends of 2018 got a little weird. Anyone remember the male rompers?

While some trends such as the one named above are more for entertainment, other fads take off among Pinterest users and health-obsessors alike, such as the keto diet.

The popularity and acceptance of tattoos have raised drastically over the years. In fact, four out of ten U.S. adults aged 18 to 69 have at least one tattoo. This leads to the 2018 trend of glow in the dark tattoos.

If you’re considering getting a glow in the dark tattoo, continue reading. We have the facts and answer popular questions we know we’re wondering about. Read on!

What are Glow in the Dark Tattoos?

There are two types of glow in the dark tats – which make new or old pieces almost-invisible to the naked eye. The ink jobs typically contain bright, fluorescent colors which are invisible in daylight.

The tattoo ink used is an ultraviolet (UV) ink. Contrary to popular belief, it doesn’t contain the chemical compound phosphorus – the stuff used in glow sticks. This new UV ink doesn’t glow in the dark but instead becomes visible under black lights.

Two Types

There are two different types of UV ink used to create these neon tats. As mentioned earlier, they don’t have the capabilities to glow on their own unless put under a UV light or a blacklight.

Invisible UV Ink

Invisible UV ink isn’t visible to the naked eye. By itself, the skin may appear red or slightly raised until you put a black light over it. For a different look, you can get invisible UV ink under or over regular tattoos to give it a glowing effect.

This ink is made from fluorescent ink, but if made properly it doesn’t contain any phosphors or other toxic chemicals.

Colored UV Ink

The other type of UV ink is colored. These look like regular tattoos until you get under a UV light. The tattoo will start to glow, the colors turning to a more fluorescent palette.

To make these tattoos more striking and noticeable, people will often use them in combination with invisible UV ink.

Pros

We know some trends aren’t for everyone, but tattoo trends seem to have caught many people’s attention. Know the good and the bad about glow in the dark tattoos to make an informed decision about your newest ink addition.

Invisible UV inks are a good choice for those who have strict workplace guidelines on visible body art and piercings. Not only will these make you more professional in the workplace, but it makes a tattoo more impressive once it becomes visible with the pop of fluorescents and colors.

There are more than 45 million people who have tattoos in the United States. Due to this high statistic, it makes having a one-of-a-kind tattoo almost impossible. UV ink tattoos are rare and unique, helping you stand out or blend in.

Cons

Despite how beautiful and mesmerizing these inks are, they do have some drawbacks to consider before making your next appointment.

Another problem some tattoo enthusiasts have come across is a reputable tattoo shop which will do this kind of ink, or carries the right kind. The UV ink is harder to work with, and some artists are inexperienced with using this kind that they’ll overwork the area.

Though fading can happen in regular tattoos, especially after extreme sun exposure, fading is more likely to happen in UV tattoos. They have a short lifespan with regular touch-ups required at least every few years.

FAQ’s

Due to how young glow in the dark tattoos are there are still many questions about them. While we’ll have to wait and see about the long-term effects, we do have some answers to the most asked questions below.

Are Glow in the Dark Tattoos safe?

We mentioned earlier the above tattoo inks don’t use phosphorus, but there are many side effects to consider. While some tattoos are rejected by the wearer’s skin, these glow in the dark tats are rejected more frequently than typical ink.

In some cases, the skin becomes so irritated and uncomfortable the tattoo has to be removed altogether.

As of now, UV ink seems to be safe minus the side effects and allergic reactions recorded in some cases.

How Long Do They Last?

Glow in the dark tattoos should have the same lifespan as a regular tattoo, but, they do fade over time. As mentioned earlier, because this is a new trend the full effects of the UV ink are still unknown.

Are They FDA Approved?

The FDA continually researches the effects of regular tattoos and it is important to note that they have not officially approved UV ink or any tattoo ink.

Glow in the Dark Tattoos

Glow in the Dark TattoosIt’s hard to tell whether the glow in the dark tattoo trend will continue to grow in popularity or if it will fade as others have in the past.

Until then, it’s important to learn as much information as possible about them before deciding on a permanent addition, whether you use UV ink or not.

Make sure to consider all the pros and cons before making your decision, and if you notice a skin reaction like the ones stated above, contact your tattoo artist immediately. For more information on tattoos or to make a consultation at one of our locations, contact us or visit our Henderson Tattoo Shop or Maui Tattoo shop